Theatre

Nearly fifty years since the start of an amazing rock band, Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull takes up for another tour most recently making a stop at the Chicago Theater. With him, he brought his classic songs and jammed away. Needless to say, the night was filled with incredible music.

A few minutes after 8 p.m. the lights dimmed to let everyone know it was show time. People made their way to their seats excited in anticipation of an explosive show. The upscale Chicago Theater was an excellent setting for a night with a musical mastermind. The ushers were helpful, fans were happy, and then the lights faded.

The show started and the powerful rock band painted the canvas of music for the evening. The earlier portion of the show contained a couple gems; “Living in the Past” and “Nothing is Easy”. These crowd pleasers were just what everyone wanted. They kept nailing the riffs in a refined way and delivering the music.

Ian Anderson brought along some really sweet sounding flute to the theater. His musical ability and showmanship is second to none. Playing fast-paced flute while standing on one leg while making mischievous looks are all part of his unique skill set.

Up next was a rewritten version of “Heavy Horses” that had a different twist. New lyrics were added to the song, but there was also a virtual singer involved. Screens behind the band were in sync with the show and had singers on the screen that were pre-recorded.

A favorite among so many, “Thick as a Brick” was yet another a great selection from Jethro Tull. The current lineup of musicians did the piece justice duplicating it. The presentation of the edited version makes quite a nice show and demonstrates the musical insanity of Ian Anderson.

Band Members;
Ian Anderson – Guitar, Flute, Mandolin, and much more!
David Goodier - Bass
Scot Hammond – Drums and percussion
John O’Hara – Piano, keyboards, and accordion
Florian Opahle – Guitar
 
The night went along playing one Tull song after another. Ian’s magic flute shines on the song “Bourree”. The instrumental piece always makes the fans happy. The polished up version was a perfect selection for their set. It wouldn’t be an Ian Anderson show without a classical piece like this one from J.S. Bach. The only way to continue was with “Farm on the Freeway”, “Too old to Rock n’ Roll, Too Young to Die,” and “Songs From the Wood”. Then the band took a quick intermission.
 
The crowd was very pleased at the start of the first set with “Sweet Dream”. Florian Opahle had his guitar tone set just right to mimic the record. Everything he does shows he can handle the guitar work produced on Jethro Tull albums. He nails the riffs and sound all while making it his own.

“Dharma for One” is a jam that ends up in a drum solo. Scott Hammond played some of the most incredible rolls going all over the kit in what was a seriously hard piece to play. His style and ability match, or surpass, that of any drummer around.

The deep bass feeling from David Goodier on “A New Day Yesterday” was the start of the blues jam that got some people moving. He blended well with John O’hara on keyboards. All of the musicians have some seriously good chops.

“Aqualung”! The opening guitar riff is one that stands out well. The heavy guitar-based song had the crowd on their feet and moving. The solo was incredible as well as the rhythm section. Once the song was over with the cheering didn’t stop and unfortunately the words, “Bye-bye! Bye-bye!” were said. No one was going to let them leave without playing one more song.

The band did not let their fans down. The song began and the audience was happy. The FM hit, “Locomotive Breath” gave a final punch to the show. The bug eyes and over the top leadership within Ian provided a memorable show. His song writing and musical styling was a pleasure within a live setting to see. The man is way beyond a flute player. He is a showman.

After almost fifty years of being involved with music, Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull continues to tour with no signs of stopping and no reason to. The Chicago Theater was a perfect setting for the magic flute work of Ian and his amazing band. As always, they were a delight to see.

 

Published in In Concert
Thursday, 10 August 2017 22:14

Delbert McClinton - One of the Fortunate Few

 

I have been waiting to see Delbert McClinton for a while. It just never happened for me…timing, etc. Finally, it happened. I even took my Mom who is as big a fan as I am.

Warming up for Delbert was Amy Black, a singer/songwriter from Nashville. Black sang only accompanied by piano, which blended perfectly with her very strong voice that comes with powerful with awesome intonation. However, I didn’t feel that strongly for her songs. They were well written but just not overly catchy. In fact, I walked away with no memory of them at all, but only that of an amazing voice. I would like to see her with her full band instead of the simple piano/voice arrangements. Maybe that’s what was missing.

Then, after a brief intermission following Black’s set… Delbert McClinton walks onto the stage. I can’t even comprehend how many times he has done this. “Take Me to the River” was the opener. Del’s version is way more swampy feeling than Talking Heads - not even the same song. Del’s hand-picked musicians formed a tremendous band. No name brand guys. No one under fifty or sixty-years-old. I don’t even remember a band introduction. It was all about the music.

What about the music, you ask? McClinton’s music is self described as Blues but there is much more to it than that. It more like the intersection of Blues Road, Country Avenue and Old Rock and Roll Boulevard. If you think of music like cooking I guess it all kinda comes from the same kitchen, but his unique formula really makes the flavors that stand out. You have the basic recipe but when you start adding spices and such…things get extra tasty.

In a way, I feel here is a guy that should be headlining stadiums. But when I see him work a club, my thoughts change. An intimate venue like such is the perfect environment for Delbert. He is basically a breathtaking club act with great songs. Sometimes we put too much emphasis on the bands playing the hockey stadiums and forget the guys in the clubs exist. The lesson here - go see more musicians like this where you can see the expressions on their face and the watch each note played with finesse and passion rather than viewing a giant monitor.

Let’s get back to the songs. “When Rita Leaves” was played early in the set and another crowd favorite “Ain’t I Got a Right to be Wrong?” was included in the first five, six songs. He has SO many great songs. Two of Delbert’s songs that always stood out were songs at least partially penned by a guy named Jerry Lyn Williams – the same guy that wrote a chunk of Clapton’s later hits. “Giving It Up for Your Love” is a classic that was on the set list. The other is a beautiful song called “Sending Me Angels”.

Music like McClinton’s is good for your cardio-vascular system. It even gets the older people dancing…did I mention that? Well, I just turned fifty and took my seventy-one-year-old mother…and there were people older than her dancing. Some of you youngsters should get out and watch a band like this. You might not be able to keep up…unless somebody breaks a hip.

 

Published in In Concert

Delbert McClinton may not be a household name, but he should be. A singer-songwriter, harmonica player, pianist and guitarist, we are talking about a gifted musician who has been active in the music scene since 1962 and is showing no signs of slowing down some fifty-five years later. It is even rumored McClinton taught John Lennon how to play harmonica. The Texas native is a multi-Grammy Award winning singer, earning one for his 2006 release Cost of Living, an album where each track is infused with McClinton’s unique vision and is as impressive as the next. In a career that has been nothing short of remarkable, McClinton has recorded with several big-named artists including Bonnie Raitt and Tanya Tucker with whom he landed his highest-charting single “Tell Me About It” in 1992.

McClinton’s music is exceptional in the fact that it bridges the gaps between Blues, Rock and Country. At nearly seventy-seven-years-old, he still plays his music with the energy of a much younger man and entertains with the best of them. Inducted into the Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame in March 2011, I highly recommend music fans who have not yet seen this talented artist to do so – and you can next week. Currently on tour for his latest effort Prick of the Litter, Delbert McClinton will be performing at City Winery Chicago on Wednesday August 9th. The wine and music will be flowing that night for sure.

Published in In Concert

A rainy summer night and this party was a guarantee to go on no matter what. The indoor concert venue The Arcada Theater in St. Charles, was the place to be Friday night. The people packed into the ninety-one year old building for a rock show and Femmes of Rock starring Bella Electric Strings gave them just that.

The upscale concert hall was the perfect setting for a rock concert. The walls are decorated with artists that have performed at the Arcada and other music related items. A drum-set chandelier helped to illuminate the main entrance.

From the moment the show started these young ladies strutted their stuff around the stage and played with precision. Each move was well rehearsed. With a pumped up audience to play for, this incredible band performed some of the coolest classic rock songs ever written.

“Kashmir” seems to be a perfect song for this band to play. The Middle Eastern feel is such a natural fit for the violin. These top notch players made a version of Led Zeppelin’s masterpiece that was a perfect opener. Only thought was, how can they possibly keep that energy of the first song? Somehow they managed to do so.

The Femmes of Rock is led by Nina DiGregorio. She dresses in a heavy metal manner similar to that as the Kelly Bundy character, but can play a heavy metal violin. She shreds on the instrument and moves in such a powerful way. This wild child is much more than a pretty face. Her abilities are amazing to see and hear especially with such an amazing band behind her.

Four beautiful women playing violin with a rock band is just something to see. The idea brings classic rock music and a burlesque style show to the stage. The amazing talent and collection of songs selected was all just a perfect combination.

Earlier in the day they were on WGN’s channel nine in Chicago. They played their cover of “Eleanor Rigby” and it was just a version that was remarkable. The choppy swipes at the strings were done so with good mechanics in an almost robotic sort of way. Of course, they played this one at the show as well.

A major highlight of the evening was their cover of the Queen song “Bohemian Rhapsody.” The girls sat down and sang out the song. It was a very beautiful vocal moment that led into violins playing one of the most popular songs ever.

The long jam at the end goes through some of the best guitar solos from the classic rock era. One guitar god after another was displayed out on violin. Music from Deep Purple, The Eagles, AC DC, Pink Floyd, Led Zepplin and many more!! They played a full show, but it ended too soon; left the audience wanting more. Everyone wants to see more of a good show.

The incredible venue of The Arcada Theater does it again by bringing some of the best shows to downtown St. Charles, Illinois. The monumental size of a show that Femmes of Rock with Bella Electric Strings can bring to the stage is amazing. The pure talent is packed into a fun filled night of fast paced violin runs that was a pleasure to see.

Published in In Concert

Louis Prima Jr. and The Witnesses are packed with energy and are – just pure fun. At no point during the show do they let you forget that they are entertainers. For two solid hours, their upbeat show played hits going back to a different time. Every moment was absolutely enchanting.

The City Winery is an upscale restaurant/concert venue with a superb wait-staff. Their food, wine and, decorated tables made a perfect atmosphere for Louis Prima Jr. and The Witnesses. A well-dressed crowd entered the establishment after using valet parking, ate edible creations that were out of this world, and sipped on delicious wines just prior to the show. Candle lit tables, glass bottles of water and cloth napkins set the scene for one of the best shows on Earth.

For approximately five decades Louis Prima Sr. entertained crowds with his musical show in a positive and comedic way. Performers have been covering his music and style since the 1930’s. Benny Goodman, David Lee Roth, and Brian Setzer are among the most popular names to do versions of the great Louis Prima’s work. His son, Louis Prima Jr., is now paying homage to the music his father wrote and other work from different artists.

The Witnesses came out and started to prepare the audience for an incredible band leader, Louis Prima Jr. The horns were pumping and out walked the man in his striped suit who immediately started to sing the opening number “Jump, Jive an’ Wail.” The music was right on the money with every beat, note, and song performed.

A favorite song for so many people was “Just a Gigolo (I ain’t got nobody)”. The song was performed so well that it was just like the original recording. The Keely Smith role for the evening was covered by the extremely talented Leslie Spencer. Her voice was just as powerful as Keely’s was and she nailed every note with perfection during the concert. The mixtures of the male and female voices were done in the same vein as the original artist to whom this show was patterned after.

Louis took time to speak to the audience like they were friends. He made eye contact with anyone and everyone who was close enough to the stage. He mentioned that recently his son had been sick and was in and out of the hospital a lot over a year and a half. He continued to explain that, “The only thing that held it together was playing with his band and performing on stage for such wonderful people. The people in the band are very important to me.” Without their personal relationships, he would not have been able to go on.

The time during the show was held together by A.D. Adams on drums and Johnathan Frias on bass. These two kept the time so well and paved the road of songs for all the other stand-alone musicians on the stage. On guitar was Ryan McKay with a nice hollow body electric and blended well with the keyboard player Gregg Fox. Their high notes were in sync all night with the sax player Marco Palos and Ted Schumacher on trumpet. Another bottom end performer was the baritone sax player William Pattinson who hit notes that you felt deep down in your soul. Phillip Clevinger was the trombone player and together they all made up an incredible band.

All of them displayed incredible showmanship as they didn’t just come out and play their instruments of choice. They played and moved around without stopping. They aren’t just musicians; they are entertainers.

When “Angelina” began, almost every concertgoer in the place was singing with joy. “Oh, mama zooma zooma baccala” was being belted out at every table during the song about the waitress at the pizzeria.

The comedic number, “Banana Split For My Baby” was a definite highlight during the show. Louis warned everyone that he can never remember all the words of the storytelling song that put a smile on so many faces. He started to fumble the words, but regained himself immediately and laughed. No one seemed to care as he went on with grace describing all he wanted his baby to have.

The Witnesses talent is not just within the instruments they play. They all sing well and proved it throughout the night. Louis took a seat behind the drums and A.D. Admas came out to the front of the stage and they started in with the Chicago song, “25 or 6 to 4.” The horn section played every piece with accuracy. The band also continued to belt out the songs “Evil Ways”, “Proud Mary”, and “Your Mama Don’t Dance”. The entire band was like a jukebox for the evening playing one hit song after another.

Toward the end of the show Louis marched out into the audience with his band members following him in a single file line. They slapped hands, did high fives, and showed everyone how down to earth they really are. They finally made it back to the stage and unfortunately the show was over.

Louis Prima Jr. and The Witnesses laid out such an awesome evening that no one in the entire venue could have been disappointed. The vibe itself expressed from the music and the band’s personality created an overall feeling of warmth. No band could ever leave an audience in a happier mood. The entire evening was just a joy and an honor to see. As people waited in the streets for the valet parking attendants to bring back their vehicles, one man made a comment about the show. “I’m so stoked! I can’t wait to see him again.” Everyone nodded in agreement. It was just a tremendous evening at The City Winery.

 

Published in In Concert
Friday, 07 July 2017 18:13

Buddy Guy is Real

Buddy Guy is real. In a music business where people often portray an image onstage - a persona - Buddy Guy is real. When you go see him play, that’s what you get and nobody walks away not knowing a little something about the man.

Before Guy’s set at Ravinia Festival, we were treated to the music of Booker T. Jones. Some of you might say, “who’s he?” Booker T. and The MG’s were the house band at Stax Records. They were on many songs that you remember, but they were not the faces on the record. Most people do recognize their hit “Green Onions”, but if you asked who it was…

His was a nice short, but effective, set. I had hopes of Buddy coming out and playing a song with Jones but that might have actually taken the focus away from Booker’s music in a way. It was really nice to hear the Hammond Organ being played by the actual person you heard play those melodies. Booker even played guitar and sang…but…that organ, that sound… It’s almost become a lost instrument today. I say almost because you do still see them but we could be witnessing the tail end of the instrument’s impact. I’d love to see bands today bring back the organ.

On the other hand, Buddy Guy was born to play the guitar - to quote his own song. I think that is true. However, he does not play the way your guitar teacher will tell you to play. What does that mean? It means he just plays the guitar. He doesn’t study it. He doesn’t analyze it. He plays the guitar. Guy’s playing has been a huge influence on Rock’s elite but many just don’t get it unless they see the man play live. You cannot capture Buddy Guy on a recording. It’s just not the same. His performances should not be repeated. They should not be recorded. They should be experienced. You need to be there when he walks out into the crowd, and this could not have been truer than at Ravinia the other night.

I don’t want to go off on a tangent here, but go see more live music. Before music turns into a complete corporate clown show, go see more live music. Live music has so many benefits. Musicians pay their bills nowadays largely in part by playing live. Free downloads killed CD sales. We need to support these artists. Maybe the decay of integrity can be slowed down or even repaired if we did this. Go see more live music.

Artists too are to blame. They need to be real. That’s why the music of some people lasts forever. Formulas are for scientists, not musicians. Just be yourself and make some music. Be like Buddy Guy. I do not mean imitation. Just be real.

Guy’s set was amazing. You will never see the same show twice. He starts one song and may finish it or he may jump to anther song. The band needs to be on their toes. I am sure they rehearse most of that but I am sure a huge part of rehearsal is learning how to follow Buddy’s lead. The Blues as a musical form has always involved a lot of improvisation. You actually get to hear music at its point of creation. You can’t rehearse that part of the process, the creation. To witness this is a gift to you from the artist. This leads me back to the reasons to go see live music. It’s like gift exchange. They give you the music. You go see them so they can pay their bills. It’s good for the economy. Go see more live music.

Published in In Concert

Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, and John Lodge brought a show to the Ravinia stage that knocked out everyone who was in attendance. Two full sets of music packed with hits from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s were the band’s musical offerings for the evening. Without a doubt, it was a musical setting that was great to see, hear, and feel.


There is nothing like going into a concert venue to see a favorite band. The crowds of people dress in their best going out attire and get all polished up like a pretty penny. They make their way to the seats to see some good music and moments later lights finally fade and the music starts. Excitement runs through the crowd as the first notes begin.

  
It’s just a magical time during the summer concert season at Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, Illinois. The Moody Blues only add to that magic. The legendary band came triumphantly took the stage and played a no nonsense show, having lost nothing in their fifty plus years as musicians. Their music was absolutely flawless from start to finish.


The first set contained hits from their vast catalog. They opened the show with “I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)” and grabbed the attention of the audience right away. Hayward and Lodge both have amazing voices and hit every note with perfection. There wasn’t the slightest crack or imperfection in any of the performer’s voice.


Songs from the video age of the 1980’s were a big hit among the fans. “The Voice” and “Your Wildest Dreams” were definitely crowd pleasers. They kept reminding us of their amazing writing capability as their set list unfolded.


“The Story in Your Eyes” was a highlight from the first set that grabbed a few inexperienced Moody Blues fans by surprise. “Oh my God! They’re playing this song too?” If you listen to classic rock, it’s hard to not know The Moody Blues music. It’s still everywhere on the FM dial.

“Steppin’ in A Slide Zone” began with the melodic dynamic build and thrilled the more dedicated fans of this amazing band. The keyboards and guitars were blending so well in what was a great piece of ear candy. For the few that didn’t know the song, I’m guessing it had to impress them as well.


Set two was reserved for the fiftieth anniversary of Days of Future Passed. They played the album in its entirety and this is the reason a lot of people came out to see the famous band. A few people in attendance even gave up their Grateful Dead tickets to witness this once in a lifetime performance.


The monologues were prerecorded by Jeremy Irons and he nailed it. He sounded just like the original recordings. “Tuesday Afternoon” and “Nights in White Satin” were the bigger hits from the album. Getting the chance to see this composition from start to finish was a real treat. It was a musical journey that everyone will remember from the orchestral interludes to the psychedelic writings of 1967. Originally released just after the summer of love, the album is a timeless recording that will always stand out as one of the best of all time.  


Graeme Edge was awesome on the drums and kept hitting them with finesse while not missing a beat. Billy Ashbaugh was an additional drummer brought on the tour to help keep the time within the show. Justin Hayward did such an amazing job on the guitar and vocals, the show wouldn’t have been the same without him while John Lodge provided the bottom end with his bass guitar and brought along some sweet vocals as well. Rounding out The Moody Blues sound, Alan Hewitt performed some amazing keyboards and vocals. Everything he did was just like the original recordings. Norda Mullen is a multi-instrumentalist who fills in so many gaps for The Moody Blues, but really stands out with her flute. The tour also included Julie Ragins, another multi-instrumentalist who just seemed to play everything. She quickly proved she wasn’t there to take up space. Together these people are the current lineup for The Moody Blues and they shouldn’t change a thing. These professional musicians stand out within their instruments of choice. They famously blend so well with one another.

The Moody Blues is just an amazing band in a live setting. Age does not seem to affect this band in a negative way, the musicians defying Father Time. Their musicianship seems to keep getting better as the years pass. It’s always a pleasure to see people refine their talents and put them on display for everyone to see. Ravinia was just a perfect setting for this nostalgic display. It was a delight for everyone who was there.

 

Published in In Concert

Pegasus Theatre Chicago is proud to announce MUSE 2017: Femmes Noires de la Resistance, July 13 - 23 at Pegasus’s resident home Chicago Dramatists, 773 N. Aberdeen. This year’s MUSE celebrates new works, new artists and new voices with this annual series of theatrical readings, panels and performances featuring female artists intersecting ideas, visions and artistic excellence. Tickets are $10 per performance and Festival passes ranging from $18-35, which allows for access to 2 events or unlimited MUSE events, and performances. All tickets and passes are available at PegasusTheatreChicago.com or by phone at 866.811.4111.
 
This year’s MUSE, Femmes Noires de la Resistance, focuses on black women holding their own power.  MUSE 2017 will feature storytelling duo In The Spirit, spoken word artists Surviving The Mic, Black Feminist Poetics, 3 Arts Awardee Candace Hunter, musicians K’hala Elizabeth and L11 and theatrical performances by Tasia Jones, with excerpts from the plays of Marsha Estell, Loy Webb and Kendeda Winner Tsehaye Hébert.
 
The 2017 MUSE: Femmes Noires de la Resistance, curated by Nikki Patin with Ilesa Duncan and Regina Victor, and hosted by Nikki Patin and guest host Melissa DuPrey. includes:
 
Theatre Showcase
Thursday, July 13 at 7:30 p.m.
The theatre Showcase includes theatre artists Tasia Jones and readings of new plays by Marsha Estell, Loy Webb and Kendeda winner Tsehaye Hebert.
 
Spoken Word Showcase
Friday, July 14 and July 21 at 7:30 p.m.
Featured in this spoken word showcase are Surviving the Mic and Black Feminist Poetics.
 
Storytelling with IN THE SPIRIT
Saturday, July 15 and July 22 at 7:30 p.m.
Starring Chicago’s premier storytelling duo comprised of Zahra Baker and Emily Hooper Lansana of IN THE SPIRIT. 

Music/Performance Showcase
Sunday, July 16 at 3 p.m. and Thursday, July 20 at 7:30 p.m.
These two performances in MUSE 2017 include music and film showcases featuring musicians L11 and the webseries “Seeds,” and on Thursday, July 20th, 3Arts Awardee Candace Hunter (Chlee Arts) and musician K’hala Elizabeth.
 
Panel Discussion
Sunday, July 23 at 3 p.m.
The final day of MUSE 2017 includes a panel discussion focuses on black women and women of color theatre leaders. Guests and audience members will discuss the topic with artists and performers from the Festival.
 
NIKKI PATÍN, HOST/CO-CURATOR
Nikki Patín has been featured in The Guardian, Chicago Tribune, HBO's “Def Poetry Jam” and on international television and radio. A Peabody Award-winning poet, Patín has been writing, performing and educating for almost 15 years. She has taught hundreds of workshops on spoken word, body image and interpersonal violence. Recently, she addressed the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on behalf of Black women survivors of sexual violence. She holds an MFA in Creative Non-Fiction from the University of Southern Maine. Her work can be found at www.nikkipatin.com.
 
ABOUT PEGASUS THEATRE CHICAGO
Pegasus Theatre Chicago has been a mainstay in the Chicago theater community for nearly 38 years. Its recent rebranded mission is to produce boldly imaginative theatre, champion new and authentic voices and illuminate the human journey. The theatre adheres to the core values of community engagement, social relevance, boldness, adventure and excellence.
 
Pegasus is also committed to initiating important conversations through the arts with strong community engagement and socially relevant programming, including the Young Playwrights Festival for high school-age scribes, which celebrated its 30th Anniversary in 2017. Pegasus Theatre Chicago has received seventy-seven Joseph Jefferson Citations since its inception.
 
Pegasus Theatre Chicago is proud to announce MUSE 2017, July 13 - 23 at Pegasus’s resident home Chicago Dramatists, 773 N. Aberdeen. This year’s MUSE celebrates new works, new artists and new voices with this annual series of theatrical readings, panels and performances featuring female artists intersecting ideas, visions and artistic excellence. Tickets are $10 per performance and $25 for a Festival pass, which allows unlimited access to all MUSE events, and performances. All tickets and passes are available at PegasusTheatreChicago.com or by phone at 866.811.4111.

 

Published in In Concert

Saturday night was a night of firsts for Ravinia, hosting its first Hip Hop show that included a lineup of first-time performers on the stage, and featuring the one and only Common. One does not typically think of Hip-Hop when thinking of the outdoor picnic grounds and pavilion of Ravinia, but tonight even with the chance of rain (rain ponchos provided) fans from Chicago and its surrounding suburbs showed up in high numbers to groove and dance the night away.

With sponsorship from United and 107.5 WGCI, DJ Anthony took to the decks, making his Ravinia debut to open the night at this all ages concert. Fans know him from his radio spots on GCI and his current work as a producer on Cody Chestnut’s and the new Gorrilaz album.

Next up, was Tay (Taylor Bennett), another Chicago native from 79th Street and brother of Chance the Rapper, also making his Ravinia debut. With samples of tracks from his album Restoration of an American Idol and Broad Shoulders, the audience got a good feel for this up and coming rapper and his style of music. He was invited by Common as a late addition to the night’s musical lineup.

After twenty-five years in the music business, the Golden Globe and Grammy winner, and Oscar nominated musician for the theme song from Selma (“Glory”), once again took the stage in his hometown Chicago (well, Highland Park, anyway – close enough). This appearance marked Common’s first ever performance at Ravinia. I have seen quite a few shows at Ravinia, there are often a handful of dancers sprinkled throughout the crowd, scattered among the seated in the pavilion and across the grass, many standing on their feet for portions of a show. But the crowd response for Common was the most avid I have personally seen at the festival. The moment, Common stepped onto the stage, the entire pavilion arose from their seats, most remaining on their feet dancing and cheering for the entire show. Those with lawn tickets pressed themselves against the barricades while others danced atop the grass. Common pulled the crowd in, never letting go, playing his award-winning hit "Glory" along with songs that spanned throughout his twenty-five-year career known and loved by his fans. His was a high energy performance, and with meaning, as Common reinforced the purpose behind his Black America Again album. His message is simple in that supporting a community of people working together, enjoying music and life together, we are building a safer and more connected Chicago and world.

There is much more to see and be seen of Common in the future. With Common’s newfound success at the festival, perhaps more Hip-Hop acts will be scheduled for Ravinia. “I wondered if they liked Hip-Hop at Ravinia”, the artist jested to cheers across the venue. Yes, we do. With so much energy and love in the air, it was an unbelievable night of Ravinia firsts. www.Ravinia.org

Set List:
The Corner
The People
The Food
U, Black Maybe
Get ‘Em High (Kanye West)
Come Close
Testify/Darling Nikki (Prince)
I Used to Love H.E.R.
Take It EZ
Go!
Love Is…
The Light
Forever Begins
Be (Intro)
Glory

Published in In Concert

Collaboraction Theatre Company announces Darkest Before Dawn: A Dark Circus of Music, Theatre and Fashion, an immersive event to raise funds for their celebrated Youth Theatre Ensemble, The Peacemakers.

The event's all-star line-up includes the DJ trio Dark Wave Disco, Black Plastic, a fashion spectacle by The Order, Kelroy, DJ Heaven Malone, The Peacemakers and Founding Collaboraction Company Member Sandra Delgado (La Havana Madrid).

General admission is $15. 

Funder tickets are $40 in advance/$50 at the door, and include access to a private balcony, a Darkest Before Dawn gift bag, appetizers and drinks.

Friday, June 30th at The Chop Shop 2033 W. North Ave in Chicago.
The Funders reception starts at 7 p.m. 
Doors open at 8 p.m. 

Black attire encouraged.

For tickets and information, visit collaboraction.org or call (312) 226-9633.

Darkest Before Dawn Artist Lineup 

 
Dark Wave Disco
 
After receiving national attention from big names such as SPIN and BPM, Dark Wave became known as "one of the hottest parties in the country." Big acts like Steve Aoki and New York's notorious MisShapes all dropped in to mix sets with the new kings of the hipster set over the next two years, securing Dark Wave's notoriety and also, stellar guest list. - Chicago Scene Magazine

 

Black Plastic

A self-titled debut album was released last year on Cleopatra Records, its ten tracks filled with an indelible sense of dread combined with manifestations of dark wave and synth pop. Grady is best known as the founder of the award-winning cult magazine Lemon, which has featured collaborations with the likes of David Bowie, Daft Punk and Sonic Youth. This will be the band's first ever performance in Chicago.

 

THE ORDER
Jet-black, rebellious and compelling, THE ORDER is a conceptual women's fashion label that weaves together innovative design, high quality craftsmanship and wearability to create a powerful story that is both dark and feminine. 

 

Kelroy

Kelroy is a five piece rock band from the great Goddess Chicago. Their sound is an intense, thoughtful and unique mix of post rock psychedelia with a whole lot of mood. Dark and raw yet uplifting.

 

Sandra Delgado

Sandra Delgado is a Colombian-American actor, singer and writer born and raised in Chicago. She is a regular on the stages of the legendary Steppenwolf Theater and the Goodman Theater. She is a founding ensemble member of Collaboraction and an ensemble member of Teatro Vista, where she served as Associate Artistic Director from 2006-2008. Delgado is also on the National Steering Committee for the Latina/o Theatre Commons, an advocacy group for Latino theater artists. In 2011 she received the prestigious TCG Fox Foundation Resident Actor Fellowship in residence at the Goodman Theater in Chicago where she developed her solo show, para Graciela. She has since written and starred in her own show, La Havana Madrid, a theatrical, cinematic and musical history of Latino Caribbeans in Chicago.


Heaven Malone

Malone has DJed around the country in New York City at Girls & Boys and the notorious TRASH! party at Webster Hall in New York City, at A-list celebrity poolside hangout, Nightswim at The Hollywood Roosevelt in Los Angeles, and several Lollapalooza After Parties hosted by Aaron Paul (Jesse Pinkman of Breaking Bad). As "David Bowie Is...", the multi-media museum fashion exhibition of acclaimed rocker David Bowie came to Chicago, Malone DJed and produced multiple Bowie Ball events sponsored by The Museum of Contemporary Art.


About Collaboraction's Peacemaker Teen Ensemble


Led by Collaboraction Director of Youth Programming Luis Crespo, Collaboraction Peacemaker's Teen Ensemble creates original devised theater focusing on peace in Chicago. Collaboraction works with over 200 Chicago youth per year, with the most committed and passionate students advancing to Peacemakers. The Peacemakers appeared in Collaboraction's 2016 PEACEBOOK Festival and perform throughout the Chicago to promote peace. They return this fall in the second annual PEACEBOOK Festival, launching Saturday, August 26 at Chicago's Goodman Theatre.

Published in In Concert
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